Dating richard armitage biography

The period of Mughal rule (1573-1660) was a time of relative peace and security, in contrast to the earlier period of oppressive rule from the Delhi Sultanate (13th-15th cent.).

) was established, allocating different areas to the religious care of specified priestly lineages.

We do not have a precise date when these agreements were reached.

The oldest manuscript detailing them is dated 1543 (Sanjana, pp. The Panthaks were: (1) Sanjān between the rivers Pardi to Dahanu (nowadays based in Udwada); (2) Navsari between the rivers Pardi to Variav and the River Tapti; (3) Godavra, from Variav to River Narmada near Broach; (4) Pahruc from Ankleshwar to Cambay; and (5) Cambay.

The dead lay in heaps and the dying got no succor - such was Fate’s grim decree.” The battle went against the Hindus, who fled, but the Parsis stood firm and after three days the Muslim forces withdrew, before returning the following day with reinforcements. “The din of clashing swords rose above the land, waves of blood flowed over the field like a river.” Ardašir was struck by an arrow, “blood poured out of his wound; weakened, he fell from his horse and died. Perhaps the significant aspect of the story is not its debatable historical significance and plausibility, but rather the literary manner in which it invokes imagery from the then focuses on the story of the sacred fire, Irān-šāh. 1-13) dates the sack at 1490, while Shapurshah Hodivala puts it before 1478, probably 1465 (pp. 56-57 on a possible external account of the stay at Bahrot). Eduljee considers it one of the few fixed dates in Parsi history, namely 1419. This does not bring into question the basic narrative that the Parsis settled in the northwest coast sometime in the first millennium, that they consecrated a fire of the highest grade, and that they were threatened by Muslim conquest, which forced them to take the fire into hiding before establishing it at Navsari. 42), the does not claim that it relates the only migration of Zoroastrians from Persia.

The Parsi leader, Ardašir, rushed on to the field like a lion and roared out a challenge. riding a swift horse, charged at Ardašir with his lance … When tragedy beckons even marble becomes soft as wax” (, tr., pp. The Hindu-Parsi alliance was defeated and Muslims ruled the land. Fearing for its safety in the face of the Muslim invasion of Sanjān, Parsi priests took it to the mountain of Bahrot, south of Sanjān, and hid it in a cave for twelve years before taking it to the village of Bansda; the dates are again disputed. There were two major Muslim conquests of Gujarat in the approximate period referred to in the in 14; it is not clear which of the two dates is relevant. The first (the poll tax levied on non-Muslims), but there is no mention of the transfer of Irān-šāh to Navsari through his proposal, a momentous event which would have been mentioned if it had occurred by then (, tr., p. Such events shape community identity and their memory is generally carefully preserved, but precisely because of their importance the stories can be subject to later “elucidation.” Sanjān was at the turn of the millennium a thriving port, and it is plausible that it was a major Parsi settlement as the , tr., pp. The early settlements were in locations with harbors, some of which could accommodate large ships that crossed the oceans, for example Cambay and Broach, while others, such as Navsari, were harbors used by ships pursuing the coastal trade.

It is a feasible that these were regarded as the main Parsi settlements at the time (Dhabhar, pp. A is the terrible hardships suffered by Iranian Zoroastrians, who interpreted their suffering as signs of the final assault of evil before a savior would come and the renovation commence.

In the 19th century some western academics and Parsis were excited by what were first thought to be long lost ancient Zoroastrian mystical texts, the relates that it was the product of one Dastur Āḏar Kayvān (see ĀẔAR KAYVĀN) and some of his followers.Iranians have been involved in trade with India from Achaemenid times, but the creation of a Parsi settlement in India was the outcome of the migration of Zoroastrian refugees from their original homeland in medieval Islamic Persia. 1), 775 (Seervai and Patel), 780s (; all quotations from this source are taken from Eduljee’s translation), 785 (Modi, 1905, pp. He asked for an account of their religion and laid down four pre-conditions before agreeing to grant them sanctuary: They should use only the local language, the women should adopt the local dress, they must put down their weapons and vow never to use them and, finally, their marriage ceremonies should be conducted only in the evening; the dastur agreed.There is debate over the exact date of this exodus: 716 CE (S. In his account of their religion he emphasized the features that accorded with Hinduism, for instance, reverence for the sun and the moon, fire and water, and the cow.Various Parsi scholars have attempted to identify this invasion with known external history, but with no clear conclusion (S. Because the route to Bansda was impassable during monsoons, Irān-šāh was eventually moved to Navsari at the behest of a legendary leader, Chāngā Āsā. The sea-borne trade between western India and the Persian Gulf (and to East Africa and China) dated back centuries (Kearney).The Parsi migrants were not therefore venturing into unknown territory, but to a region with which Iranians had long traded.

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After some time the settlers approached the king for permission to build a temple to house their most sacred grade of fire, an Ātaš Bahrām (see ĀTAŠ). The history of that fire, known as Irān-šāh, their “king of Iran” in exile, is central to much subsequent Parsi history.

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